BA (Hons) Filmmaking

UCAS CODE:

P3W3 (Brighton)

P3W4 (Manchester/Birmingham)

INSTITUTION CODE: B39

Apply Now

A 3 year full-time degree available at:


This course is industry recognised by ScreenSkills,* at our Brighton College, the industry-led skills body for the UK’s screen-based industries, and carries the ScreenSkills Select quality-mark which indicates courses best suited to prepare students for a career in the screen industries.

Are you really passionate about film? Do you want to get your hands on the kit used to make real films? Do you want to learn your craft from real filmmakers? Screen and Film School is dedicated to one thing: Film. The BA (Hons) Filmmaking is focused on creating the next generation of filmmakers.

This cutting-edge industry-led course provides you with the opportunity to acquire the fundamental skills and techniques of film production required for a sustainable career in the film and related creative industries.

You will also have the opportunity to collaborate with creative practitioners from other arts disciplines through Screen and Film School’s partnerships with the BIMM Institute and the Institute for Contemporary Theatre.

This course is validated by BIMM Institute and taught at Screen and Film School. Upon successful completion, students receive a degree from BIMM Institute.

* Screen and Film School Brighton only

All students leave Screen and Film School with a professional showreel, which will serve as a calling card for your skills, and an understanding of how to navigate the film industry.

The Film School teaches with HD and Film to introduce you to working with both mediums. The BA (Hons) Filmmaking undergraduate degree introduces you to a variety of film genres and styles and covers the principal creative and technical skills and roles that are found in the film industry including screenwriting, directing, cinematography, producing, production sound mixing, editing, lighting/gaffer, continuity/script supervision and production management.

As you move through the course, you will be able to specialise in a film form through a range of optional modules offered in the second year including narrative shorts, documentary, experimental film or feature film screenwriting.

The development of your practical film production skills is supported by a film theory strand which provides you with a critical understanding of applied film theory and ensures that you will enter the film industry as an informed practitioner.

Throughout your time at Screen and Film School, industry engagement is embedded into your chosen degree course. Freelance opportunities, internships and work experience will be offered with our range of industry partners so you can put your film craft skills into practice.

Course Specification

Mode of attendance: Full-time

Length of course: 3 years full-time

Awarding institution: BIMM Institute

Campus delivery: Brighton, Manchester, Birmingham

UCAS codes: P3W3 (Brighton), P3W4 (Manchester/Birmingham)

Institution code: B39

Language of study: English

Final award: BA (Hons) Filmmaking

Minimum Requirements

A-levels or BTEC

Normally two A-levels at grade C or above (64 UCAS Tariff points), or BTEC Extended Diploma MPP.

International Baccalaureate

24 points.

Access to HE Diploma

Pass with 60 credits overall. At least 45 credits at level 3, with 24 credits at merit or above.

GCSE (minimum grade C or grade 4)

At least three GCSEs to include English language and mathematics.

Studied before or got relevant experience?

A qualification, HE credits or relevant experience may count towards your course at Screen and Film School, and could mean that you do not have to take some elements of the course or can start in year 2 or 3.

English language requirements

IELTS 6.0 overall, with 6.0 in writing and a minimum of 5.5 in other elements.

Applications are welcomed from students who might not have the qualifying entry requirements but can demonstrate a proactive commitment to narrative film, documentary, music promo or some other type of moving image creation, in the moving image disciplines.

All applicants who demonstrate the potential to meet the entry requirements will be asked to submit a portfolio of their own work in support of their application. This can either be done at an applicant day, where applicants showcase their portfolio of work to a film tutor and partake in a number of interactive workshops, or through submitting an electronic portfolio to be reviewed by a film tutor. Applicants will be considered who meet the academic entry requirements, demonstrate a good standard of portfolio work and provide a compelling personal statement.

Examples of portfolio work include showreels, short films, screenwriting pieces, academic film analysis, photography and anything that reflects passion and enthusiasm to study Filmmaking at Screen and Film School.

Course Fees

£9,250 per year (subject to review) – there are no compulsory additional course costs however we strongly recommend investing in a Terabyte external hard drive and a personal laptop/Macbook.

Year 1

All students take the following core modules in their first year of study.

The first Creative Industries & You module sets you on the right path towards pursuing your dream career in the creative industries. Whether you are focused on a particular career goal, or considering multiple career options, you will broaden your knowledge of the opportunities available to you as a creative professional in your specific field. In course groups, you will research career routes and examine the career journeys of inspirational creative professionals to determine key skills for success. In mixed classes, you’ll participate in activities to help you navigate life in higher education and the creative community, expanding your social networks. You will reflect on your progress, explore what motivates you, identify personal strengths and potential roadblocks, and support each other to develop realistic action plans to help you along your chosen path. Supported by your Personal Adviser, you will create a Personal and Professional Development Portfolio, which you will adapt and develop throughout your studies at Screen and Film School. This module also gives you the freedom to extend your learning by providing access to the Industry Skills Booster online courses, developed exclusively with industry employers, which you can select in accordance with career goals and identified areas for development.

This module provides you with a foundational and practical grounding in the technologies, crafts, roles and fundamental principles of cinematic digital/film production. It introduces you to the key technical production roles and practices of current digital/film production, focusing on primarily the roles of camera, lighting and sound. You will also be introduced to set protocol and how the different production departments interact to create a finished product. Collaboration and an appreciation of each production role is key. You will start to develop your understanding of a range of different equipment at entry level within the camera, lighting and sound departments and, through workshops and work simulation environments, start to understand the complex and challenging environment of film production. This module will also aim to support and develop your creative thinking and problem-solving ability, whilst also introducing you to the importance that communication and collaboration skills play in film production.

During this module you will learn practical post-production techniques and crafts and be introduced to post-production processes associated with the role of an Editor. This module will give you a fundamental understanding of editing theory and the general stages of the post-production process. You will be introduced to the importance of post-production workflow and the role it plays within comprehending professional post-production. This module aims to introduce to you the importance that collaboration and communication skills play within the process of filmmaking and how an editor communicates with the director in order to create a coherently edited and colour graded outcome and also aims to embed these practical, logistical and creative skills at an introductory level for you to gain a good understanding and grounding in post-production. Finally, the module will also explore the relationship the role of an editor has with the different production departments and explores the connectivity and role that post-production has within the filmmaking process.

This module looks under the bonnet of the script to screen process at an industry level and with the Producer at the centre, being the person who buys the rights to an idea, sees it through to distribution and recoups the box office percentages. It will investigate the various ways a film is financed, the role of public funding and transnational co-production strategies, the changing landscape of development, distribution and exhibition in the digital era, exploring how this varies for different formats such as feature films, shorts, documentary and high-end TV drama. The outcome of the module is a research-based case study of a film of the individual student’s choice. The investigative research uses industry resources such as Screen Daily, BFI Network, BFI Yearbook, BFI box office data, Broadcast Magazine & more to find out about their case study’s funding, organisations, personnel, marketing campaign, release strategy (including festivals and wider distribution) and success with the audience.

This module will enrich your storytelling ability and broaden your visual language by introducing you to the knowledge and skills of production design. You will gain insight into the role of production designer and art director, workings of the art department and relationship with production and the wider industry. In the module you will learn, employ and present specialist art department skills. This will expand your industry knowledge and provide you with a set of tools to enhance your filmmaking practice across all specialisms.The module comprises of two projects; a short collaborative research project and a longer independent design project. Through these two projects you will gain both specialist and broad industry knowledge, this will raise your level of professionalism, ability to communicate and present your work to a high standard.

This module will provide you with a chance to apply skills developed in Semester 1 realised in the production of a collaborative short film and will develop your critical understanding and advance your filmmaking practice in the craft and production of a short-form film. You will have a chance to utilise and develop your production and technical skills within the collaborative production process and gain understanding of the production cycle in greater depth, from idea development through to the completed edit. This module will also develop your understanding of key production processes in these genres in relation to their production specialism, including idea development, pre-production, production and post-production, collaborative working and the visual realisation of ideas. The outcome can be realised in the following genres; factual & documentary, fictional narrative, short form branded content or advertising, music video or innovative or experimental moving image.

Following on from your exploration of the creative community and career opportunities available to you in Creative Industries & You, this module will help you to develop a deeper intellectual understanding of the creative arts and industry structures. You will be challenged to investigate some key contemporary cultural issues relating to your professional field, developing a contextual understanding through research, questioning and debate. This awareness will help you to make informed creative and business decisions in the future, and articulate them sensitively, acknowledging the different perspectives and experiences of others. You will explore pivotal cultural moments that have shaped the creative industries, exploring the factors that make something ‘popular’, and how key cultural issues affect both art and business. Reading, research and critical thinking skills will be developed to help you examine developments in industry and the creative arts, communicating your arguments in a variety of formats. You will have an opportunity to meet with your Personal Adviser in a 1:1 tutorial to help you identify your strengths and areas for development, updating your professional portfolio and selecting relevant online Academic Skills Booster courses to support on your path to academic success.

This module will provide you with a chance to apply skills developed in Semester 1 realised in the production of a collaborative short film and will develop your critical understanding and advance your filmmaking practice in the craft and production of a short-form film. You will have a chance to utilise and develop your production and technical skills within the collaborative production process and gain understanding of the production cycle in greater depth, from idea development through to the completed edit. This module will also develop your understanding of key production processes in these genres in relation to their production specialism, including idea development, pre-production, production and post-production, collaborative working and the visual realisation of ideas. The outcome can be realised in the following genres; factual & documentary, fictional narrative, short form branded content or advertising, music video or innovative or experimental moving image.

Year 2

All students take the following core modules in their second year of study, plus two optional modules

Please note that the offering of optional modules in individual Film Schools, in any given academic year, will be subject to the availability of resources and sufficient student interest.

The creative arts have the power to bring people together, unite communities, support mental well-being, raise awareness of social issues and above all, bring joy to many people around the world. In Creative Industries & You 2, you will discover how you can turn your passion and talent into a collaborative project with a positive impact on society. Employing research and networking skills, you will develop a greater understanding of a charity, cause or campaign. In teams of students from all Screen and Film School courses, you‘ll select a cause and identify a way to support its key objectives, either by raising awareness, raising funds or contributing as volunteers. You will be introduced to Screen and Film School’s partner charities but you are also able to find your own, or work independently of an existing organisation. Through this collaborative project, you’ll develop essential interpersonal and communication skills, experimenting with various digital tools for enterprise. You’ll reflect on your own values, applying theories of human psychology to explore how to get the best out of yourself and each other. Building on your industry research skills, you will assess your target audience and define clear SMART targets for your project that will enable you to execute an element of the strategy and evaluate its success. In teams, you will spend time working on your project both in class and in your own time, developing effective collaborative working methods. You’ll record your project activity in your Personal and Professional Development Plan, reflecting on how you have developed and changed over the course of your first year and a half at Screen and Film School. Working with your Personal Adviser you will identify objectives, opportunities and actions that will help you stay on the path to success for the second half of your journey towards becoming a Creative Industries Professional.

This module continues the exploratory work you began in Context & Culture of the Creative Industries. You will directly apply ideas to your own discipline and development, selecting an area of investigation relevant to your own practice, and communicating your argument via your medium of choice. The concepts you encounter will actively critique claims to authenticity and originality; themes you will encounter frequently throughout your career as a Creative Professional. You will debate artistic production, the motivations for it, and the problems of creative autonomy. You will investigate relevant contemporary cultural issues and theories relating to society, race, gender,technology, and the environment to develop your contextual understanding of how these relate to your own creative practice, professional values, and sense of personal agency. You will be encouraged to meet with your Personal Adviser in a 1:1 tutorial to help you reflect on the strengths and areas for development identified in your Personal and Professional Development Plan in first year, tracking your academic progress and setting new actions that will support you to achieve your best work. The research methods and study habits you develop throughout this module will prepare you for next year’s Final Project, in which you will self-direct a significant piece of academic, creative and/or professional practice.

This module will provide you with a chance to apply skills developed in Year 1 and within your optional specialisation modules in Year 2 within the production of a collaborative short film, and will develop your critical understanding and advance your filmmaking practice in the craft and production of a short-form film. You will have a chance to utilise and develop your production and technical skills within the collaborative production process and gain understanding of the production cycle in greater depth, from idea development through to the completed edit. This module will also develop your understanding of key production processes in these genres in relation to your production specialism, including idea development, pre-production, production and post-production, collaborative working and the visual realisation of ideas. The outcome can be realised in the following genres; factual & documentary, fictional narrative, short format marketing or advertising, music video or innovative or experimental moving image.

This module will provide you with a chance to apply skills developed in Year 1 realised in the production of a collaborative short film and develops critical understanding and advance your filmmaking practice in the craft and production of a short-form film. You will have a chance to utilise and develop your production and technical skills within the collaborative production process and gain understanding of the production cycle in greater depth, from idea development through to the completed edit. This module will also develop your understanding of key production processes in these genres in relation to their production specialism, including idea development, pre-production, production and post-production, collaborative working and the visual realisation of ideas. The outcome can be realised in the following genres; factual & documentary, fictional narrative, short format marketing or advertising, music video or innovative or experimental moving image.

This module develops your understanding and development of narrative structure and the art of screenwriting. It will also develop your critical understanding of the crafts of short-form storytelling and also how to structure and write a feature-length script. You will be introduced to the key fundamental elements of screenwriting; Theme, plot, story and characters and work towards developing your ideas into a completed script. This module will also introduce you to professional protocols that are inherent within the screenwriting process. Screenwriters prepare their script in a way that enables readers to envisage the setting, emotion and the way the film will work cinematically on screen. A screenwriter collaborates with producers, directors and actors to draft and redraft their script, often working to tight deadlines.

This module introduces you to the practices and crafts of short-form narrative development and directing. It will enable you to develop your narrative and directing skills for fiction-based filmmaking and will explore how directors research and develop their ‘vision’ for a film focusing on idea and story development creative visualisation and develop your skills to be able to successfully work with actors. A director needs a broad-brush stroke of skills to be able to realise a writer’s intention from the script, to visualise it through the shots, framing and lighting and then work successfully with actors in order to bring a script to the screen successfully. This module will introduce you to these skills that are needed in order to take on this role and support your development as a director through a series of workshops, seminars and masterclasses. Through a series of working and directing actor workshops, you will also gain an introduction to the important skillset a director has to develop in order for them to work with actors successfully. Throughout the module, you will also develop your communication skills (both visual and verbal) and ensure that you are able to work successfully within a team in order to realise a short narrative.

This module introduces you to the research, development and realisation of factual programme-making and documentary production. A documentary is a broad term to describe a non-fiction film that in some way documents or captures reality. The definition of the factual or documentary genre is constantly developing and changing, and this module aims to give you the directing skills in order to research, develop and direct a short factual film or documentary. The module will also introduce you to the different forms and approaches to documentary production. This will include how to develop your documentary directing skills in directing observational sequences, interviews and visualisation of your ideas. It will enable you to develop your directing skills to create accomplished documentary outcomes and will explore how directors research and develop their idea for a film focusing on idea development and creative visualisation. It will also explore the ethical implications of working with contributors and the moral and ethical dilemmas of representation.

Building on the experience of production in level 4, this module introduces you to the role of the Producer as well as the other key roles in the production department. Producers are central to the production process from initial idea through to distribution Through this specialist module you will be introduced to the professional protocols that make up the role of producer. The producer often comes up with story ideas and hire writers or choose and secure rights to scripts.

They decide on the scale and budget of the film and source financing from investors, studios and distributors. They work with creative ideas from the director and approve production costs. They also spot and solve potential problems throughout the production process and approve locations and hire a team of staff for the production, delegating certain responsibilities to a line producer. It’s their job to create a good working environment and they constantly communicate with everyone to make everything run smoothly.

They have ultimate legal responsibilities for the health and safety of the crew on set and delivery of a completed film at the end of the production process. Through a series of workshops, seminars and production meetings this module will cover the key areas that a producer and production manager deal with on a production of a film and will cover; financial acquisition, crewing, casting, negotiation of locations, budgeting, scheduling, insurance and intellectual property.

This module will build on knowledge gained in the Level 4 Production Design Module and give you a more advanced insight into the art department. With a focus on the role of the art director, this module will continue to enrich your storytelling ability, broaden your visual language and help you become a better communicator.

The learning and employment of specialist skills will expand your industry knowledge and provide you with a set of tools to enhance your filmmaking practice. Through research and speculative art direction project work, you will learn, employ and present your skills, expanding industry knowledge and enhancing your filmmaking practice. It will also enable you to work more efficiently on your live short film projects and build a portfolio of work to help you in your career aims

This module develops your understanding and technical fluency in the key creative discipline of cinematography, the film craft specialism of the Director of Photography. A cinematographer or director of photography (sometimes shortened to DP or DOP) is responsible for making artistic and technical decisions related to the image. The DOP will work closely with the director to develop the look and feel of the film.

They research how to create the films aesthetic through lighting, framing and camera movement and will have a good understanding of the camera and lighting kit and crew needed to achieve this. The DOP works and collaborates closely with the camera operator and the camera department to achieve the look and tone of the film through the camera and lighting choices. This module will support and develop your understanding of both the theoretical grounding and practical experience of working as Head of Department in this central creative production role, with a focus on developing visual language and storytelling.

Throughout the module, you will gain a fundamental grounding in the professional protocols of current industry practice including camera and lighting basics, colour theory and previsualization and research and development of the image.

This module will develop your understanding and technical proficiency in the related disciplines of sound recording and sound design. You will learn throughout this module these two distinctive different roles that sound playswithin film production and you will gain an in-depth understanding of the processes and protocols of recording sound on set, and also developing a soundscape or working in sound design in post-production. The sound recordist is responsible for the recording of audio on the shoot and through the appropriate use of microphones and mixers ensures that the sound is properly recorded. A sound designer works closely with the editor in post-production to develop the narrative and meaning of the film through sound design. During this module you will develop your comprehension of sound theory and practice which will inform your production and post-production roles in the sound department. During this module you will also learn about recording sound on set, the development of soundscapes and sound design and the realisation of sound in the final mix.

This module will introduce you to the major role that the editor has within the production and post-production process. In major productions, an editor will work closely with the director to develop ideas. Once the production starts, the editor will look at the rushes each day, checking technical standards and the emerging sense of story and performance and editing it into a series of scenes. By the time filming ends the editor will have spent hours reworking scenes and cutting them together to create a rough assembly. The editor and director will then work closely to refine the assembly edit into a final cut. This module will introduce you to editing theory and film grammar, alongside developing your technical proficiency in the key stages of an editing and post-production schedule. During this module, you will develop your understanding of the different elements of the post-production workflow including data organisation and management, and also the process of grading. You will also be introduced to the different styles and processes of editing within different genres including fiction, documentary, music video and short form branded content

VFX and compositing is key in creating visual effects within a film. This module will introduce you to the technical and production skills that are required to work as VFX and compositing practitioner in industry. Compositing means seamlessly integrating digital assets with live-action footage to bring together the final shot of a film. It is the final step of the VFX process, and a skilled compositor will build the layers together of various elements in a way that makes them appear to naturally belong in the same space. This module will cover basics that will ensure that you have the appropriate skills in order to start developing within this specialism. The key areas that this module will cover will be camera shots and the framing of the shot. Other areas that you develop your production and technical skills in set extension & matte painting, green screen compositing and keying and stabilising moving images.

 Building on the experience of production in level 4, this module introduces you to the role of the developing, commissioning and distribution industry processes. Though film production is often in the limelight, there are other vital elements that seldom receive the same recognition; these include development, distribution and commissioning. This module provides an introduction to these key processes in film business and the related roles and responsibilities that come together to bring films from idea to the screen. The landscape of development, commissioning and distribution is often complex and diverse and this module will introduce you and support your understanding of how to navigate it in order to develop ideas, secure intellectual property rights and co-production deals and ensure that it is funded. It will also introduce you to distribution costs and pre-sales, global territories, copywrite and deliverables.

This module advances your technical knowledge and skills in the camera and lighting departments. This module will primarily focus on camera, lighting and grip. The relationship between the camera, grip and lighting department is key to how the shot will look. The camera department will all work closely with a director to ensure the shot that the director wants is realised. The camera operator (alongside the camera department) will ensure the framing and focus of the shot is correct and the grip will ensure that movement of the camera works to realise the intended meaning of the shot. This team works directly with the cinematographer who brings together the director’s vision in terms of lighting and camera. Through a series of practical workshops, seminars and lectures you will gain in-depth technical knowledge of the roles of camera operator, camera assistants and focus puller using a variety of both digital and analogue film cameras. You will also gain knowledge of camera systems and grip equipment, in both in the film studio set-up and on location. Finally, you will also gain an indepth technical knowledge of the roles of the gaffer, best boy and sparks. This will include a fundamental grounding in green screen, studio lighting, electrics, cable management and health and safety in the both the film studio and on location.

This module will build on Level 4 Short Film modules to focus on the role of the Assistant Director. The Assistant Director and their team are the glue that holds together a shoot, their main aim being to ensure the successful creative realisation of the script within the parameters of the production and working closely with the Director, Producer, DOP, make-up, wardrobe, actors and supporting artists. The ADs are responsible for scheduling the shoot, running the floor, ensuring that scheduled scenes are completed and ultimately making sure each day runs as smoothly as possible to support the creative vision. In this module, you will learn about the role of the AD team, become proficient in creating core production documents and develop an understanding of scheduling strategies, running the floor, crew dynamics and leadership skills. Through this module you will gain specialist industry knowledge, raise your level of professionalism and will develop your ability to communicate and present your work to a high standard. It will also enable you build a portfolio of work to help you in your career aims.

This module provides you with the opportunity to conduct your own research and apply an understanding of film theory to your own practice as a filmmaker. Through a series of lectures and seminars exploring film theory and academic research skills you will explore and develop your understanding of historical context, practice-based theory and the broader social impacts of filmmaking and your chosen specialism. The module provides you with a strong academic foundation to support your production work in both level 5 and level 6.

 

Factual Entertainment makes up a huge proportion of our broadcast and nonbroadcast factual programming. Bake Off, X Factor and Love Island are prime examples of this genre. This module will introduce you to the production processes and structures of the factual entertainment form and will enable you to navigate the different roles to ensure understanding of this varied and broad form of factual television. The areas that the module will introduce you will include the role of the idea development producer and how to prepare you to realise, develop and pitch factual entertainment ideas. Seminars will also be given on finding the appropriate commissioning editors and also identifying who the audience is for your idea. This will include how to navigate the industry and identify the different broadcasting, streaming services and commissioning structures that make up this landscape. The module will also explore how to develop Ideas in factual formats and how to realise your ideas and creativity through brainstorming within an idea development team.

Year 3

All students take the following core modules in their third (and final) year of study, plus one optional module.

*Please note that the offering of optional modules in individual Film Schools, in any given academic year, will be subject to the availability of resources and sufficient student interest.

This module is the final step in your Film School journey and will support you as you look to enter your chosen field as a creative professional. Drawing on evidence from throughout your time at Screen and Film School you will critically self-evaluate your personal learning journey and industry engagements to date. You will explore concepts and theories of personal and professional development to support, challenge and test your assumptions, to determine your readiness for work in the creative industries. You will have the opportunity to discuss this with your peers and learn from your collective experiences in both small degree path groups and large mixed discipline sessions. With this position in mind, you will then be challenged to create and consolidate creative assets to give you the edge over the competition in your chosen field. Specialist workshops will be offered throughout the module, informed and delivered by our wide – reaching connections and specialist tutors in the creative industries. This culminates in the creation of a portfolio which tells the story of your personal and professional journey so far, communicating your unique professional identity and future career plans in the creative industries.

In this module you will undertake a significant project of your own choosing. It’s your chance to explore your passion within the industry and creative arts: experiment, take risks, strengthen your skills and create a product/cohesive portfolio of work that you are proud to showcase at the end of your degree. This module will support you in consolidating the broad learning and development from the course so far, building a bridge into industry, the workplace and future opportunities. You will be supported to self-direct your own learning through a series of lectures, seminars and 1:1 tutorials with expert supervisors. Primary and action research are supported in this module both through theory and feedback guidance. The series of lectures will provide a strong theoretical understanding of key research methodologies and approaches, and the application of this learning supported through feedback in seminars and tutorials. The foundations for research theory and practice are laid spine modules (as well as some core modules) in both Year 2 and 3.

Through this module you will gain an in depth understanding of your production or post-production specialism and then implement it within a professional context within the production of your graduation films This module focuses on your engagement with your principal production role in preparation for working collaboratively on a digital film/film production in the Production Realisation module in Semester 2. The possible roles that you will specialise could be Producer, Writer, Director (Fiction or Factual) Cinematographer, Camera Operator, Grip, Production Designer, Assistant Director, Sound Recordist & Designer and VFX Effects Designer and Editor. These are the roles that you have been developing your creative, technical and logistical skills within during Year 2 and Year 3 of the course. You will also develop and refine your collaborative and team working skills through this module, in order for you to able to realise your specialist role within a production team. Through the pre-production process you will explore all aspects of development and pre-production relevant to your chosen role and work in your production teams to prepare your films in readiness for production in production realisation.

Within this module you will be supported with the development of a major film project through production, post-production and with the final realisation and delivery of the creative outcome. This module builds on and advances your development and pre-production skills that you have been working on during the Pre-production Process module and supports you to realise this research and idea development process within the production of a graduation film within this module. This module represents the culmination of all the technical, logistical and creative development that you have undertaken within your time on the course and supports you in utilising it within a production role of one or more of the graduation films. You will have focused on your areas of specialisation in Year 2 and Year 3 and this expert knowledge that you will have developed during these modules will enable you to work successfully at a professional level on this module, with skills appropriate to Year 3. The module will also refine your collaborative working skills, enabling you utilise them within a high end, professional production.

You will chose one of the two optional modules you completed in Year 2 and continue to advance your skillset in your chosen specialism. Please see the list of optional modules under the ‘Year 2’ tab.

All optional modules will be subject to the availability of resources and sufficient student interest. To ensure fairness in regards to you accessing the optional modules that you would like to take, Screen and Film School operates a robust selection process. We ensure that we support you to identify your area of specialist interest and then work with you to secure an optional module of your choice.

Any questions?

For any questions regarding our courses or if you’d like more information on how to apply to Screen and Film School, please contact our Admissions Team on 01273 602070 or email [email protected].

 

© 2021
Screen and Film School