Make a scene: Inaz Hussain

8 July, 2022

Here at Screen and Film School we know that a thriving set requires a broad community of creative, talented people who all have a vision and play a role. Joining this industry is a chance to be part of something bigger than yourself.

Over the course of the summer, we will hear from the students themselves and discuss their relationship with film as well as their overall Film School experience. We will also cover a range of filmmaking specialities. This week we caught up with Screen and Film School Brighton’s final year BA (Hons) Filmmaking Student Inaz to discuss his filmmaking journey so far.

What sparked your initial interest in film?

What sparked my interest in filmmaking was when I became involved with an organisation named Integrate UK (fka Integrate Bristol during the time I joined) back in Bristol who were doing short films and music videos. With them, I started to build more interest in film. I saw filmmaking as a hobby to do when I wasn’t in school. I started off being an actor within those films and then became someone who helped in the pre-production side and then becoming a crew member. I still help out whenever a new project comes along.

What was the first film you ever remember watching?

My earliest memory was watching one of the Pokémon animated movies which was either Pokémon the first movie or Pokémon 3 the movie. Live action was possibly the Pacifier with Vin Diesel.

Why did you decide to study at Screen and Film School?

I chose to study at Screen and Film School mainly because I saw all the equipment they had there and saw how practical the course is compared to everywhere else. It’s a great place to meet so many different people looking to create films as well.  

What is your favourite part of studying your specialism?

My specialism is sound. Some of my favourite parts of being a soundie is being the first person ready before every other department is ready. Another one is the different parts within the sound department such as foley and composing music. My main focus is within on-set sound (location sound). There are so many parts that you can be a part of which helps to know the basics that I enjoyed learning about. 

What have been some of your greatest moments as a filmmaker?

Definitely being a sound recordist for a medieval film and a western film. Both films were graduation films and were genres I wanted to be involved in. I never thought it would happen this year but it did and it was a crazy experience on both sets. Another moment I was proud of was seeing films I worked on got into festivals such as Cinecity Brighton and just recently Brighton Rocks. To see and hear my work in festivals or cinemas is a very surreal experience for me which tells me that I’m heading in the right direction.

Have you had to overcome any challenges?

I’ve had to overcome a number of challenges throughout numerous films, such as filming outdoors in cold weather, faulty equipment and sometimes having to push the limits of what we’re working with. There are many more challenges that I had to overcome during my filmmaker journey.

What has been your highlight of studying at Screen and Film School so far?

Seeing films I’ve worked on at the Duke of York cinema, which is one of the oldest running cinemas in the UK, and to have my film school journey start there for my induction to seeing numerous films I worked on the big screen. We came full circle and it was a crazy journey from start to end. 

What was the best piece of advice you received as a filmmaker?

Always do the best you can in your role and never be afraid to ask for help. We will never have all the answers so just ask. And never be afraid to make mistakes. We’re only human. 

Why is collaborative working so important in film?

The course really helped to get everybody to network and work together. As there are so many people, it gave us a chance to work with various types of people which made some shoots great to work on. Collaboration is so important since making films or any type of media wouldn’t work much if you worked on your own- unless you’re willing to spend massive amounts of time on it. Everyone has their own set of skills and experience which gave us a lot to work with. It allows us to see what our strengths are and we can help each other out if we’re struggling. 

Where do you see yourself professionally in the near future?

Hopefully starting out in the sound department whether in TV or film as a runner or trainee, and building more connections alongside that. I’m optimistic considering how much work I’ve done and the contacts I made, which at this rate I’ll keep growing. I’m open to anything as long as I can be doing something within sound. 

What advice can you give applicants as they approach the beginning of their Screen and Film School journey?

My advice to anyone joining Screen and Film School is just try anything. There’s so much to explore and learn about the different departments, even if you are doing something completely different from them just learning the basics is enough so you’re not clueless and become ignorant to them. Lastly, just be nice. If you’re keen to learn and be involved while being nice to work with then you’ll be remembered for future work. 

Thanks to Inaz for his insightful words. Stay tuned for a second student voice in this summer series next week.

 


 

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